SAS britanic (Al Doilea Război Mondial)

The History of the British SAS in World War II

The History of the British SAS in World War II

The Special Air Service, or SAS, was formed by David Stirling in 1941 with the purpose of acting as a desert raiding Airborne force unit that would secretly fight behind enemy lines in the North African campaign. The first units of the SAS, comprised of around 60 men, were called the “L” Detachment Special Air Service Brigade. This name was intentionally used to confuse the Axis forces, making them think it was a much larger paratrooper regiment.

Missions and Operations

In November 1941, the SAS embarked on its first mission, Operation Squatter. Parachuting behind German lines in support of the Operation Crusader offensive, the SAS was tasked with attacking the Airfields at Ghazala and Tamimi. Unfortunately, the mission was a failure, with 22 men being killed or captured, and no enemy aircraft destroyed.

However, their next mission proved to be a success. Transported by trucks from the Long Range Desert Group, the SAS destroyed 60 enemy aircraft without suffering a single casualty.

By 1942, the SAS had gained notoriety among the Axis Powers in North Africa. German forces were on constant alert for the next SAS attack, with the most successful SAS member, Paddy Mayne, reportedly destroying over 100 planes. The SAS also used jeeps in hit-and-run attacks against Axis airfields and fuel dumps, which were obtained from the lend-lease scheme and modified for these types of attacks.

Activities Beyond North Africa

Following the German defeat in North Africa, the SAS turned their attention to Europe. They were involved in the Italian campaign, attempting to rescue POWs and guide them to beaches on the Adriatic coast. In 1944, the SAS played a crucial role in aiding the invasion of Normandy and helping the French resistance behind enemy lines.

Beyond D-Day, the SAS pushed into Germany, assisted in the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, and were later sent to Norway to disarm the 300,000 strong German garrison. At the end of World War II, the SAS was disbanded, only to be reformed again in 1947 to fight in future conflicts.

Conclusion

The British SAS played a crucial role in World War II, conducting daring and successful operations behind enemy lines in North Africa and Europe. Their reputation for stealth, precision, and effectiveness in combat made them a feared and respected force by their enemies. Their legacy continues to this day, as they remain an elite and revered special forces unit.


Clip video in engleza despre asta, numit : SAS britanic (Al Doilea Război Mondial)

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